Crowdsourcing teaching

I’ve just finished re-reading Jeff Howe’s 2008 book Crowdsourcing.  It struck me as I reached the end of the book that many of today’s digital natives will become tomorrow’s teachers.  The question then becomes what impact or influence will digital natives have on shaping the role of teachers and the nature of teaching. I’ve been … More Crowdsourcing teaching

A sign of the time

Thomas L Friedman, author and columnist for the New York Times was in Sydney last week for a ‘dialogue on global trends’.  He has co-authored a  book  That Used to Be Us to be published soon. In it, he identifies four major challenges for the US, which I believe are also applicable to Australia. These are adjusting to … More A sign of the time

A relevant curriculum

Over recent decades, the term curriculum has been used in different ways.  When I was teaching, curriculum was understood as lists of subjects, learning areas and courses of study.  You had the syllabus and it told you everything you needed to teach to your class.  We know this content-prescriptive approach limited the scope of teachers to … More A relevant curriculum

Why is education reform so hard?

I recently attended the Whitlam Institute Seminar to debate the question of ‘why education reform is so hard?’ The three speakers, David Bartlett MP , Hon Nick Greiner and Professor Brian Galligan from the University of Melbourne all gave similar reasons as to why education reform is needed. The perspectives presented called for greater transparency around … More Why is education reform so hard?

Reformers and adapters

I’ve just finished reading two fascinating articles by Thomas L. Friedman and Marc Prensky . There seems to be two camps when it comes to education – the reformers and the innovators who are adapters.  Like the US,  we spend millions of dollars trying to fix the system with programatic solutions that reflect a 20th … More Reformers and adapters