Funding a bold vision

It’s often said that the devil is in the detail but this election seems to be long on rhetoric and short on innovation.  We won’t become an innovative nation by looking in the rear view mirror.  Everyone recognises the need for innovation, for doing things differently including education but we lack clear examples and the drivers to deliver something different and better for the future.

How do we build, as a nation, innovation?  Why aren’t we seeing greater engagement and dialogue across industry, sectors and the unions?  Money counts but it is wasted when artificial and short-term accountability measures are rolled out under the banner of educational reform and innovation.

What is lacking is innovative thinking from our politicians and policy-makers; thinking outside the box rather than merely ticking the boxes. Funding-linked reform is doing things we’ve always done and getting the same results.  Where are the visionaries who can see beyond election cycles to creating an innovative learning nation?

I’ve yet to hear any political party talk about the early years of learning either in terms of social, economic or even health outcomes.  Let’s build innovation from the bottom up – let’s start with the early years of learning. PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) found that benefits to the GDP for children receiving a quality early education program would be up to $10.3 billion cumulative to 2050, and the benefits to GDP of increased participation of vulnerable children would be $13.3 billion cumulative to 2050.

Our Prime Minister said it himself, the big shift around innovation is a cultural one.  We need to be creating environments that stimulate not stifle innovation and that means governments working collaboratively with educators, unions and industry.

Inquiry and evidence-based policy underpins innovation not aspiration. It’s time to fund a bold vision not banal policy.

 

 


3 thoughts on “Funding a bold vision

  1. Thanks Greg for clarifying the ‘basics” of innovation, Unfortunately the term is becoming just another political slogan. Perhaps what our politicians need is some “out-a-vation” ?

  2. How do we get government bodies to work with innovators and startups and allow themselves to acknowledge that work without seeing it as a problem – I wonder!? Maybe if we could change that culture there would be more opportunity for educators to work with industry innovators?

    1. We need to build a culture of innovation and it’s sometimes easy to lay blame, however everyone has to take responsibility. It’s not a preference, it has to become a core centre piece of government strategy.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s