Basic skills

West Australian Education Minister Peter Collier suggested last month that parents weren’t putting in the time with their children at home and this was being reflected on school entry testing.

According to Mr Collier, there are increasing numbers of children starting school who lack basic skills such as being able to count, paint and hold a pencil.

The implication is that increased use of technology at home is impacting not only on the development of fine motor skills but also according to a report by Dr Jennifer Buckingham, the capacity to build language through conversation with adults and other children.

It highlights a need for researchers, politicians, parents and educators to re-visit the what, why and how of schooling in today’s world. What does it mean to be school ready in today’s world?  In ten years from now, will it be necessary for young people to know how to hold a pencil?  And what will it mean to be literate in an online world?

If literacy and numeracy are foundational skills (and they are), how are these skills developed in changing home/school environments alongside increasingly adaptive learning technologies?  And at what stage in a child’s development do we begin nurturing new ways of thinking, working, using tools and social responsibility?

If parents are being urged to do more educating at home, then what is needed are clear frameworks (of 21st century skills) for parents and teachers. This needs to clearly articulate the qualities and skills required in today’s world and the ways in which these are developed and assessed in each child.

One of the most common complaints I hear from parents is the lack of communication around what their child is learning in class, how it’s being taught and why it’s necessary.

In the context of a changing world we all need to be asking important questions about basic skills.

 


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